Our History

In 1988 a security company, Mastiff Electronics, approached Dr John Woodward the Director of the Biotechnology Group at the University of Leeds after they had seen the TV presentation of Dr Barbara Sommerville stating that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human body odour could be used to identify individuals. Mastiff wanted a black-box that would be able to detect human body odour VOCs in order to act as a biometric analyser for security purposes. Some 7 years later after a substantial investment a black-box based on solid state sensors was developed. Named 'The Scentinel', this unique instrument was revealed to the public through the popular television programme 'Tomorrows World'.

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Following this success Bloodhound Sensors Ltd was formed and sold instruments under the 'Bloodhound' trade mark. The first commercial instrument, the Bloodhound BH114, was launched in 1996 and a number of projects and sales resulted, which generated several publications in many different areas as diverse as bacterial odours for species identification, green compost monitoring, Llama meat monitoring, fungal contamination in library paper, mite infestation in wheat grain and a number of healthcare related papers in the detection and monitoring of UTIs, Haemodialysis, Helicobacter pylori and Tuberculosis. In 2004 the technology passed to Scensive Technologies which subsequently developed an improved product, the Bloodhound ST214.

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After another 4 years of development work and many field trials a totally new second generation instrument, the Bloodhound ST306 was launched together with a new software suite incorporating extensive data processing techniques. This was followed by a further device, the Bloodhound Odourspace, which introduced automatic sampling and software to give a simple Pass / Fail output.

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In 2011 the project was acquired by NetScientific plc and incorporated into a new subsidiary company, RoboScientific Limited.

Then in July 2015 directors Stan Curtis & Tim Gibson made a Management Buy-Out of the company. This gave the company the opportunity to develop into markets which were not aligned with NetScientific's chosen sector of healthcare.